Tall Ship Sailing in San Diego California

Posted: October 19, 2008 in boat, boating, boats, sailboats, sailing, yacht, yachts
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The tall ship Star of India was built in 1863 as Euterpe, a full-rigged iron windjammer ship in Ramsey, Isle of Man. After a full career sailing from Great Britain to India then to New Zealand, Star of India became a salmon hauler on the Alaska then to California route. After retirement in 1926, Star of India was restored between 1962 and 1963 and is now a seaworthy museum ship ported at the San Diego Maritime Museum in San Diego, California. Star of India is the oldest ship that still sails regularly and the oldest iron hulled merchant ship still floating. The ship is both a California and National Historic Landmark.

Star of India

Star of India by Star Isle

The Tall Ship Start of India in San Diego, California.


Star of India History

In 1901, Euterpe was sold to the Alaska Packers’ Association of San Francisco, who re-rigged her as a barque (converting the square-rigged aftermost mast to fore-and-aft) and in 1902 began carrying fishermen, cannery workers, coal and canning supplies each spring from Oakland, California to Nushagak in the Bering Sea, returning each fall with holds full of canned salmon. In 1906, the Association changed her name to be consistent with the rest of their fleet, and she became Star of India. She was laid up in 1923 after 22 Alaskan voyages; by that time, steam ruled the seas.

In 1926, Star of India was sold to the Zoological Society of San Diego, to be the centerpiece of a planned museum and aquarium. The Great Depression and World War II caused that plan to be canceled; it wasn’t until 1957 that her restoration began. Alan Villiers, a windjammer captain and author, came to San Diego on a lecture tour. Seeing Star decaying in the harbor, he publicized the situation and inspired a group of citizens to form the “Star of India Auxiliary” in 1959 to support the restoration of the ship. Progress was still slow, but in 1976, Star of India finally put to sea again. She currently houses exhibits for the Maritime Museum of San Diego, is kept fully seaworthy, and sails at least once a year. With the many other ships now in the Museum, she hosts frequent docent-led school tours (over 6,000 children a year) and also a Living History Program in which students “step back in time” and are immersed in history and teamwork activities during overnight visits.

The 1863 Star of India is the third oldest ship afloat in the United States, after the 1797 USS Constitution and 1854 USS Constellation, and is the oldest ship in the entire world that still sails regularly. Unlike many preserved or restored vessels, her hull, cabins and equipment are nearly 100% original.

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Comments
  1. babooshka says:

    I’m actually the Ramsey Daily Photo blogger. I often photograph around the harbour where the Star of India/ Euterpe was built. Very interesting post for me to read and to view the wonderful ship. I even hav photos of the commemorative plaque too.

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