Sailing News

Sailing News: Volvo Ocean Race Rick Tomlinson

Sailing News: Volvo Ocean Race Rick Tomlinson

Sailing News from around the World – The Volvo Ocean Race yachts are in dire straits, Ostar singlehanded transat sailboats pull through a big gale, CIAN wins at the Korea Match Cup, a new sailing record is set in the Mediterranean, André Budzien wins at the Finn World Masters in France, and more. Sailing news from around the world.

Volvo Ocean Race

Having solved the riddle of the fickle airs and thorny tides of the Channel Islands, the fleet is now faced with shipping lanes, and an exclusion zone in the Dover Strait.

The battle between Telefonica Black and Green Dragon at the head of the Volvo Ocean Race fleet over the past 24 hours has been intense. On the approach to the Scilly Isles, on the south-western tip of the Cornwall peninsula, Telefonica Black had taken the lead when her choice to stay south of Bishop Rock paid off. Green Dragon followed suit but after the Scillies, Ian Walker’s men veered north. When their paths collided again, the Black boat was ahead. As the duo continued to head south towards France, the rest of the fleet followed. The Dragon, with the benefit of local knowledge, courtesy of Ian Walker and Ian Moore, rolled the dice and took on the Alderney Race. Despite the brutal current, the Dragon reached the French coast and gybed down the rocks to eke out a two-mile gain. “It was a highlight of the race, rock-hopping at night in a fierce current, trying to steal every boat length we could on the fleet,” Walker added.

Telefonica Black has relished the joust with the Dragon, according to navigator Roger Nilson. The Channel Islands, he says, were challenging. “We made gains but at times we had six knots of current against us so it was tough.”

The tide will play a major hand in tactics and ultimately the positions on the leaderboard over the next few days. Given the closeness of the racing, a game of strategic chess is likely, a point underlined in this audio interview with Ericsson 3 skipper Magnus Olsson. “After two days of sailing we are still very close together. The first 12 hours was fantastic going round the Fastnet with lots of wind and at high speed. “Now the wind has dropped and it’s flat water sailing in light air. Now it’s about fine tuning, gaining a millimetre here and a millimetre there. Into the Dover Strait it’s about strategy and you have to be willing to take risks. There will be many options on how to get to Mastrand first from here.”

With 600 nautical miles remaining to Marstrand, the fleet is split by just 16 miles.  Meanwhile, repair work has been ongoing for the Ericsson duo. Skipper Torben Grael is dealing with a broken port wheel. The damage was done, says Grael, on the first night “when the boat broached during a gybe when we were hit by a big puff.” On Ericsson 3, pitman Jens Dolmer shows how to kick start the boat’s generator. “Same as hot wiring a car,” he explains.

Sailing News: Ostar 2009

Sailing News: Ostar 2009

Ostar 2009

Most of the singlehanded sailing fleet crossing the Atlantic have reported exceptionally rough weather. Bart Boosman (De Franschman) said that, ‘Since early this morning the wind has been building. At around 1600UTC it was blowing sustained over 40 knots, with driving rain and poor visibility. At the time we were planing wildly down the ever increasing waves, at speeds more in double digits than below that.’ Bart also says he was informed that JBelino has seen a large iceberg, but he didn’t give a position. Yolanda Koopman speaks of Dick (Jagar) ’in an Ocean still wild with waves coming from all directions.’ The grib files had predicted 30 knots of wind, instead Dick had 42 knots for most of the time, but gusting to 50. To add to his difficulties in these wild conditions, the floor was slippery from the mix of water and diesel and it was warm, with a sea temperature of 20C. Will Sayer (Elmarleen) confirms that, ‘The weather over the last few days has been all over the place and it finally seems to have settled in as uncomfortable.’  Katie Miller’s EPIRB was activated while sailing in the storm. Katie is safe.

Now the sailing fleet is dealing with the opposite problem, no wind, as Marco Nannini explains: “Under 1000 miles to go as the crow flies… at the current speed I will be there in time for thanksgiving turkey. literally excruciating, 1.5 knots boat speed, a strange cross current which drives the autopilot mad, it thinks we are off course and kindly tells me every 5 minutes by beeping my brains out… please some wind!” Read more about the storm at: Ostar

World Match Racing Tour

Sailing News: World Match Racing Tour

Sailing News: World Match Racing Tour

With an incredible run of form Italian skipper Paolo CIAN is the 2009 Korea Match Cup champion after defeating Ian WILLIAMS in the final at the third stage of the 2009 World Match Racing Tour.

The breeze was in, the boats were hot, and so was the action on the last day of sailing. Both semis produced edge-of-the seat sailing. Bjorn HANSEN (SWE) went down 0-3 to Ian WILLIAMS (GBR), and Paolo CIAN (ITA) defeated Ben AINSLIE (GBR) 3-0, but the scorelines don’t reflect the closeness of the racing, with penalties a-plenty, boats OCS, collisions, crew overboard, breathtakingly close calls, luffing matches and lucky break shifts that produced multiple lead changes. In fact, just about everything that could contribute to seriously hot and entertaining match racing.

First cross went to CIAN just below the top mark, but WILLIAMS gybe-set for a separation, found some pressure on the right and smoked into the bottom pin, overlapped and going round the inside. But WILLIAMS then earned a penalty to taking to much room at the mark – CIAN crossed behind WILLIAMS and led away from the pin, and just had to stay out of trouble to have the race in the bag. WILLIAMS crossed ahead of CIAN on the upwind leg, and then sailed him past the mark, gybed round his transom to clear his penalty, and went into the mark with CIAN in the lead… just. But this time the gybe-set programme didn’t work for WILLIAMS, and CIAN sailed gently down to his seventh win in a row. With this being a first-to-two match, it was now regatta point to the “light air maestro” from Italy.

Race two began with a slow motion dial-up and a good deal of tiptoe-ing around the start area. With a minute to the gun there were small signs of a building breeze, and both boats started together on port, CIAN at the boat end. WILLIAMS started to stretch out a lead, but CIAN got lifted coming back on starboard, and WILLIAMS went for a leebow tack coming into the windward mark – only to find a rapidly-reversing fishing boat pretty much in line with the mark. There was a lot of yelling between the boats as well as directed at the fishermen, and the obstruction may have been as much psychological as physical, but the net result was CIAN getting his nose inside before at the mark, WILLIAMS shutting the door and CIAN calling for a penalty but being shown a green flag in reply. WILLIAMS went right once again, and led all the way down the run – soaking low into mark two while CIAN came in quick from the left, but not quick enough: delta 12 secs to WILLIAMS. Upwind again, and WILLIAMS ran classic match racing tactics on CIAN, tacking to cover, and leading at the top by 13 secs. This clearly wasn’t close enough for CIAN to attack, and WILLIAMS crossed CIAN from the right coming into the finish and gybed into the line. Match squared at 1-1.

“It’s one-all, sudden death now, and it’s going to be tough from the port end,” said WILIAMS to the on-board camera, “but be sure we’ll come out fighting.” CIAN calmly controlled most of the pre-start, with WILLIAMS wriggling to get away, and with 45 sec to go both boats were on starboard with CIAN to leeward at the pin end and WILLIAMS bow down and going for speed. WILLIAMS started with pace, and split away to the right, followed by CIAN. First cross went to CIAN, still on port, who tacked on WILIAMS and led round the first mark by 14 sec. In a softening breeze (these things are relative!) both boats were obliged to sail shallow angles down the run, with CIAN gybing well early and soaking down to the mark to watch WILLIAMS cross behind, overstand the mark, and round a full 35 secs behind. That was enough of a lead to allow CIAN a stress-free beat, and he rounded still 34 sec in the lead. WILLIAMS went for the gybe-set split-and-come-back-from-the-right option, but just couldn’t find enough breeze to make it work, and watched the soft-touch Italian ghost across the line 15 secs or so in the lead.

It has been a shaky start to the series for CIAN, and his position in the quarter-finals wasn’t assured until the last moment. But after losing the first two matches of the best-to-five quarters to MINOPRIO, CIAN was on fire, reeling off seven wins in a row, dropping one to WILLIAMS, and then coming back in the last one to win the final. It was definitely celebration time on the Italian boat – champagne was spraying everywhere, and CIAN executed a stylish back-flip into the water. Well, who wouldn’t, with KRW75,000,000 (US$60,000) about to come his way?

At KRW300,000,000 (US$240,000), the Korea Match Cup is the richest purse on the World Match Race Tour. A good deal more champagne was soon sprayed on stage in front of the Closing Ceremony crowd, and the giant cheques were presented by the Governor of Gyeonggi Province, Kim Moon-Soo. It had been a desperately slow start to the day, but it finished in cracking style with a great demonstration of light-air precision from The Quiet Italian, Paolo CIAN.

Final Standings

1. Paolo CIAN (ITA), Team Shosholoza
2. Ian WILLIAMS (GBR), Bahrain Team Pindar
3. Ben AINSLIE (GBR), Team Origin
4. Bjorn HANSEN (SWE), Team Onboard
5. Adam MINOPRIO (NZL), ETNZ/BlackMatch Racing
6. Peter GILMOUR (AUS), YANMAR Racing
7. Torvar MIRSKY (AUS), Mirsky Racing
8. Mathieu RICHARD (FRA), French Match Racing Team
9. Sebastien COL (FRA), French Match Racing Team/K-Challenge
10. Laurie JURY (NZL)
11. Philippe PRESTI (ITA), French Match Racing Team
12. Byeongki PARK (KOR)

World Match Racing Tour Standings

TOUR STANDINGS: The Korea Match Cup was the third of ten events in the 2009 World Match Race Tour, a season long points championship for the ISAF Match Racing World Championship. Skippers will count their best 5 scores through the first 9 events plus their score at the final event of the season. The next event is the Portugal Match Cup in Troia, Portugal on June 16-21, 2009.

Current tour standings are (prior position to Korea Match Cup in parenthesis):

1. Adam Minoprio, ETNZ/BlackMatch (3)
2. Ben Ainslie, Team Origin (4)
3. Mathieu Richard, French Team (2)
4. Ian Williams, Bahrain Team Pindar (7)
5. Damien Iehl, French Team (1)

Sailing News Briefs

  • It’s World Oceans Day! Reminder to care for the oceans we all enjoy on our power boats and sailboats. www.theoceanproject.org
  • Loick Peyron wins big sailing Decision 35 catamarans in the Challenge Julius Baer
  • Disabled sailor Hilary Lister sets the record straight about her rescue reported in the newspapers: Hilary Lister about her rescue
  • The International 470 Class has announced the winners of the 2009 International Solidarity Program (ISP), which provides funding towards the entry fees for 470 Championships. In addition, the International 470 Class in partnership with Olimpic Sails has awarded four sets of sails to sailors. Among the recipients was Fraser McMillan and Erik Van der Pol of Canada, which were awarded the entry fee to the World Championship (EUR300). Winners of the 2009 International
  • Tall Ships Sailing across the Atlantic into Bermuda: Tall Ships
  • OK, they’re not sailboats, but this is amazing. Rowing boats across an ocean! Roz Savage rowing across the Pacific, Sarah Outen rowing solo in the Indian Ocean, a bunch of nuts in the Indian Ocean Rowing Race, and a couple of guys rowing from Japan to the USA: Rowing Across the Ocean
  • New Mediterranean sailing record for Kito De Pavant sailing an Open 60 sailboat
  • Second place in the final race at the Finn World Masters in Maubuisson, France was enough for André Budzien (GER) to take his third title in a row. The overnight leader Jürgen Eiermann (GER) finished fourth to end up second overall. Laurent Hay (FRA), the early leader of the regatta, finished sixth in the race which was enough to hang onto third overall. Nearly 300 Finn sailors from 24 nations had pre-entered for the 41st Finn World Masters Championship, smashing all previous records. Finn_World_Masters

READ MORE Sailing News

Archived Newsletters

SCUTTLEBUTT 2860 – Monday, June 8, 2009

Scuttlebutt is published each weekday with the support of its sponsors,
providing a digest of major sailing news, commentary, opinions, features and
dock talk . . . with a North American focus.

Twitter updates: http://twitter.com/scuttbutt

Today’s sponsors are Kaenon Polarized, JK3 Nautical Enterprises, and
LaserPerformance.

COACHES CORNER: THE IMPORTANCE OF PREPARATION
By Molly Baxter, WindCheck
Northeast weather can be tough in the winter, so we all look forward to the
warmer weather and summer sailing. If you want to be competitive this summer
in sailing you’ve got to prepare both mentally and physically to be at the top
of your game. If you prepare just a little bit, you’ll see big rewards on the
water.

Like any other sport, athletes in sailing must maintain a certain level of
physical fitness. When I graduated from St. Mary’s College of Maryland, I no
longer found myself sailing every day in a schedule set up by someone else.
Now it was up to me to make sure I created a schedule that would allow me to
stay competitive in the sport while also juggling other activities whether it
is a job, friends or other tasks that take up my day.

I decided to join a gym and grabbed a gym buddy to help push me; in my case it
was my husband John. We go to the gym together at least four times a week for
an hour before work and maintain this schedule throughout the year. There are
weeks when we only go two or three times, but our goal is to exercise as much
as we can. We focus on routines in the gym that we know will help our sailing,
including time on the rowing machine, treadmill and weights. Once you get into
a steady workout routine, you’ll not only be stronger for sailing, but
healthier and feel much better. — Read on: http://tinyurl.com/lpz2ga

YACHT CLUB ANNUAL SURVEY
The International Council of Yacht Clubs (ICOYC) released its second annual
survey of Commodore’s Concerns. The top clubs’ major concerns this year relate
to the economic crisis and its effects on club operations. The Commodores are
also worried about maintaining sponsorship to continue running major events,
and are seeking the right financial and management models for these
challenging times. This mirrors 2008 concerns about economic and club
management issues, although last year it was membership development that
featured as the main issue.

Despite the economic conditions, clubs within the Council are finding that
their members are taking a more active part than ever. Turnover is up in many
cases. The greater participation may be one way to escape some of the
uncertainties in the outside world. Many clubs are introducing new initiatives
to make sailing skills more accessible to all. Examples are the introduction
of new fleets of match or team racing boats, or the start of a new “sailing
academy”. The focus is on match racing, offshore sailing, and preparing for
the 2012 Olympics. — Full report:
http://forum.sailingscuttlebutt.com/cgi-bin/gforum.cgi?post=7569

STOKE DAD
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right – he doesn’t need another tie!), then, as he hustles to the dock to jump
on board for the Beer Cans, the Kaenon’s will truly stoke Dad. They’re stylish
and sophisticated, but they’ll also be his most prized piece of sailing
equipment – his breeze readers – with maximum protection and comfort. Always
featuring Kaenon’s patented SR-91 polarized lenses, they’re also available in
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Polarized. Evolve Optically.

OUT LIKE A LION
(June 7, 2009; Day 2) – Leg eight of the Volvo Ocean Race – the first of three
legs, which takes the seven-strong fleet to the finish in St Petersburg,
Russia, later this month, has started with a bang. Almost literally in
Ericsson 4’s case. In approximately 38 knots of wind yesterday (Saturday), it
became necessary to gybe – not the easiest of manoeuvres in these
highly-strung racing yachts at the best of times, but in a strong breeze, it
can become more than exciting.

It was a highlight for the Green Dragon team, who led the fleet round the
Fastnet Rock late last (Saturday) night. They timed and executed their gybe
perfectly whilst flying thief masthead spinnaker. They made the whole
manoeuvre look easy, in spite of forgetting to swing the keel. PUMA and
Ericsson 4, both of whom were right alongside at the time, did not fare quite
so well.

A 38-knot squall hit PUMA just as they needed to gybe. “Along with a big
shift, we decided to drop the kite and gybe to the jib, and jib reach for a
bit until the squall passed. Good plan, bad execution,” said skipper Kenny
Read. “Full gear up in 38.7 knots of wind is pretty touch and go. Just getting
the kite down is touch and go, especially when it pops up and over the top of
the mainsail and jams in the sheave,” Read said, adding, “Last time I saw
Ericsson 4, they were laying on their side and blowing out to sea.” — Read
on: http://tinyurl.com/n8ktdv

* VOLVO OCEAN RACE: Began in Alicante, Spain on Oct. 4, 2008, crewed around
the world race in VO 70’s, with ten distance legs and seven In-Port races.
Finish is in St Petersburg, Russia on June 27th. Leg 8 from Galway to
Marstrand, Sweden (950 miles) started on Saturday, June 6th and is expected to
finish by June 10th. — http://www.volvooceanrace.org/schedule/

Current positions (as of June 7, 22:00 GMT):
1. Telefonica Black (ESP), Fernando Echavarri/ESP, 835 nm Distance to Finish
2. Green Dragon (IRL/CHN), Ian Walker/GBR, 0 nm Distance to Leader
3. Delta Lloyd (IRL), Roberto Bermudez/ESP, 3 nm
4. Ericsson 3 (SWE), Magnus Olsson/SWE, 5 nm DTL
5. Telefónica Blue (ESP), Bouwe Bekking/NED, 9 nm
6. Ericsson 4 (SWE), Torben Grael/BRA, 9 nm
7. PUMA (USA), Ken Read/USA, 10 nm DTL
Team Russia (RUS), Andreas Hanakamp/AUT, Did Not Start

Leg 8 crew list: http://bit.ly/16mgAe
Event website: http://www.volvooceanrace.org
Race tracking: http://volvooceanrace.geovoile.com
Overall scores: http://www.volvooceanrace.org/rdc/#tab4

=> Curmudgeon’s Comment: It has been repeated by every team prior to this leg
that the VOR has switched to inshore mode, with tactics impacted by headlands,
calms, and currents. They even talked about anchoring. On Sunday, it only took
Ericsson 4 six hours to go from first to last, and for Telefonica Black to go
from last to first. For the armchair spectators, the Race Tracker (link above)
will provide some good viewing.

HOW GREAT WAS GALWAY?
PUMA skipper Ken Read provides these final comments as the fleet left the
Volvo Ocean Race stopover of Galway, Ireland: “I think I want to move to
Ireland. It is always sunny (at least when we were there). The golf is
amazing. The people couldn’t be nicer. You can get a pint of beer just about
anywhere you turn and all we did was win races when we were there. And people
wanted us to sign autographs and take photos with them all hours of the day.
Hmmmm. What’s not to like about all of that?

“The ‘Let’s do it Galway’ group set up a programme that could become the model
for Volvo stops in the future. They got the ball rolling and the people of the
region took the ball and ran with it. Huge congratulations to all involved. It
was our extreme pleasure to be a part of your community for a couple weeks and
you can bet your last dollar that I will be back. Long before the Volvo comes
back. Golf anyone?” —
http://www.volvooceanrace.org/news/article/2009/June/EMAIL-PUMA-L8-D2-0903/

ONBOARD RAMBLER – ANNAPOLIS TO NEWPORT RACE
A fleet of 61 boats were entered for the 2009 Annapolis to Newport Race that
started Friday, June 5th, with the course taking the fleet 473 nautical miles
from Annapolis to Castle Hill Light House at the entrance to the East Passage
of Narragansett Bay. The course record of 42 hours, 58 minutes, 12 seconds set
by Carrera, Joseph Dockery’s Farr 60 skippered by Chris Larson in 2001, was on
the line with entries such as George David’s 91’ maxi Rambler. Peter Isler,
navigator onboard Ramber, provides the following reports from onboard:

Friday, June 5, 2230 EST – We just blazed down the Chesapeake Bay… 135 miles
to the Chesapeake tower in 8h 50m! We had a great 15-20 knot northerly pushing
us down the entire way making for a great spinnaker run. As we approached the
entrance to the Chesapeake, the rainy sky grew darker and we were treated to a
great lightning show… as the low that was sucking us south was waiting for
us at the entrance of the bay. We are currently well ahead of record pace, but
unfortunately the wind has died and shifted ahead, so we are currently beating
in a NE wind of only 7 knots.. The course to Newport is 050… so our VMG is
not very good. Hopefully we’ll get out of this transition zone as the low
presses out to the east and get back rolling again. — Read on:
http://forum.sailingscuttlebutt.com/cgi-bin/gforum.cgi?post=7634

J/122 BROKERAGE SPOTLIGHT
J/122 “Resolute” – 2007. Professionally maintained since new! The keel and
rudder has been faired to a Grand Prix level and with a full suite of B&G
electronics and a full inventory of One design and PHRF sails onboard. This
boat is ready to win in IRC, PHRF, and One Design, and cruise in comfort with
the family. The JK3 brokerage list also includes many other J/Boats such as
the J/65 “Brand New Day”. We’re also featuring a J/160, a J/124, 2-J/120’s,
2-J/105’s, 3-J/109’s, 2-J/32’s, a J/29, and a J/80. “Resolute” is located in
San Diego. Call Jeff Brown at 619.709.0697 and 619.224.6200, or go to
http://www.jk3yachts.com

SPEED TIP OF THE DAY
by Eric Hood, Melges Performance Sailboats agent
How to know if the puff coming at you is a header or a lift? Draw a couple of
lines on your deck or use a couple of strips of tape 1′ long. Both port and
starboard side. Put one down that goes fore and aft with the centerline of the
boat (close to your board well), then another coming off that centerline mark
( starting at the aft end of the centerline mark) putting it at a 45 degree
angle and then another that creates a 90 degree angle off that same aft end.
Sort of looks like a seagull foot print.

Now go out and do several long beats, both tacks. Notice how a clear majority
of the time that a puff you are sailing into when it falls in that 0-45 degree
zone it will more times than not be a header. Now the same with the 45-90
degree zone off centerline. More times than not when a puff hits your boat
from this zone it will be a lift.

I have been sailing for 48 of my 53 years and did not pick up on that one till
I was in my thirties. It works. Try it out. —
http://www.melges.com/?p=news&id=1389

HAS THE NEED TO SUCCEED GONE TOO FAR?
The Laser Training Center (LTC) in Cabarete, Dominican Republic has fast
become the preferred destination for dedicated Laser sailors to hone their
craft. From those that have been to LTC, they provide glowing reports of the
consistent winds plus quality equipment and coaching. But is there more that
meets the eye? The release of LTC’s ‘Advanced Laser Boat Handling’ DVD has the
Laser class and sailing community concerned about what is being taught in this
Central America sailing site.

The question being asked on online forums: Are these sailors (US and Canadian
Champions, among others) so good, or are they violating the rules of
propulsion in light winds (aka, cheating)? Taking on the challenge of
reviewing the DVD was Jos M Spijkerman (NED), an ISAF International
Judge/Umpire, and author of the popular rules blog, Racing Rules of Sailing,
and current ISAF Rule 42 specialist Sofia Truchanowicz (POL). — Read on:
http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/blog/2009/06/laser-jibes.html

CIAN TAKES THE HARD ROAD TO VICTORY
Gyeonggi, Korea (June 7, 2009; Day 5) – After a round robin series where Paolo
Cian (ITA) and his Team Shosholoza were the eighth and final team to qualify
for the quarter-finals, Cian’s team rallied through the rest of the stages to
win the Korea Match Cup, the richest purse on the World Match Race Tour
(US$240,000).

It had been a shaky start to the series for Cian, and his position in the
quarter-finals wasn’t assured until the last moment. But after losing the
first two matches of the best-to-five quarters to Adam Minoprio, Cian was on
fire, reeling off 7 wins in a row, dropping one to Ian Williams in the Finals,
and then coming back in the last one to win the championship. It was
definitely celebration time on the Italian boat – champagne was spraying
everywhere – and Cian executed a stylish back-flip into the water. Well, who
wouldn’t, with a winner’s purse of US$60,000 about to come his way? — Full
story: http://www.worldmatchracingtour.com/da/98256

Final Results
1. Paolo Cian (ITA) Team Shosholoza
2. Ian Williams (GBR) Bahrain Team Pindar
3. Ben Ainslie (GBR) Team Origin
4. Bjorn Hansen (SWE) Team Onboard
5. Adam Minoprio (NZL) ETNZ/BlackMatch Racing
6. Peter Gilmour (AUS) YANMAR Racing
7. Torvar Mirsky (AUS) Mirsky Racing
8. Mathieu Richard (FRA) French Match Racing Team
9. Sebastien Col (FRA) French Match Racing Team/K-Challenge
10. Laurie Jury (NZL)
11. Philippe Presti (FRA) French Match Racing Team
12. Byeong Ki Park (KOR)
Match results: http://www.worldmatchracingtour.com/kmc09results

Video reports by Sailing-TV are posted on their player at the Scuttlebutt
website: http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/news/#media

* TOUR STANDINGS: The Korea Match Cup was the third of ten events in the 2009
World Match Race Tour, a season long points championship for the ISAF Match
Racing World Championship. Skippers will count their best 5 scores through the
first 9 events plus their score at the final event of the season. The next
event is the Portugal Match Cup in Troia, Portugal on June 16-21, 2009.
Current tour standings are (prior position to Korea Match Cup in parenthesis):

1. Adam Minoprio, ETNZ/BlackMatch (3)
2. Ben Ainslie, Team Origin (4)
3. Mathieu Richard, French Team (2)
4. Ian Williams, Bahrain Team Pindar (7)
5. Damien Iehl, French Team (1)
Tour standings: http://tinyurl.com/m4ltxg

SUMMER, BROUGHT TO YOU BY LASERPERFORMANCE
The days are longer. The water’s warmer. There’s no better way to get on the
water than on a Sunfish, Laser, Optimist, or one of our 15 other boats. Visit
your local dealer or check us out online for the newest boats, parts, and gear
from the world’s largest sailboat producer. — http://www.LaserPerformance.com

SAILING SHORTS
* The International 470 Class has announced the winners of the 2009
International Solidarity Programme (ISP), which provides funding towards the
entry fees for 470 Championships. In addition, the International 470 Class in
partnership with Olimpic Sails has awarded four sets of sails to sailors.
Among the recipients was Fraser McMillan and Erik Van der Pol of Canada, which
were awarded the entry fee to the World Championship (EUR300). — Full report:
http://www.470.org/Winners-of-the-2009-International

* Thirty-one nations will be represented at the 2009 470 European
Championships on Lake Traunsee, Austria, with 85 men’s-mixed and 40 women’s
teams competing June 8-14. Among the attendees are all the top three crews
from the ISAF World Cup Standings for both the men’s and women’s fleets, which
are currently led by Stuart McNay and William McBride (USA) and Henriette Koch
and Lene Sommer (DEN) respectively. Other North American teams are Adam
Roberts/ Nicholas Martin (USA), Molly Carapiet/ Molly O’Bryan Vandemoer (USA),
and Charles Modica/ Hans Jensen (USA). — Event website:
http://www.470.org/champ09/euro/

* Second place in the final race at the Finn World Masters in Maubuisson,
France was enough for André Budzien (GER) to take his third title in a row.
The overnight leader Jürgen Eiermann (GER) finished fourth to end up second
overall. Laurent Hay (FRA), the early leader of the regatta, finished sixth in
the race which was enough to hang onto third overall. Nearly 300 Finn sailors
from 24 nations had pre-entered for the 41st Finn World Masters Championship,
smashing all previous records. — Event reports:
http://www.finnclass.org/News/Masters/finn_world_masters_2009.htm

* Renowned yacht racing photographer Paul Todd has teamed up with freelance
sailing journalist Justin Chisholm to create regatta books for event
organizers, or to customize them for event participants. — Details:
http://forum.sailingscuttlebutt.com/cgi-bin/gforum.cgi?post=7632

* Dave Perry, the current U.S. Match Racing National Champion, and Andrew
Campbell, former Youth World Champion, Collegiate Sailor of the Year and
Olympian in 2008, will be coaching a Youth Match Racing Camp for sailors age
15-20 years, to be hosted by the US Sailing Center of Sheboygan (WI), in their
fleet of Sonars on July 8-12. — Details:
http://forum.sailingscuttlebutt.com/cgi-bin/gforum.cgi?post=7340

* Co-skippers and fellow patent attorneys, Gary M. Ropski, president of Brinks
Hofer Gilson & Lione, and Leif R. Sigmond, Jr., a partner at McDonnell Boehnen
Hulbert & Berghoff LLP, brought in a third place victory for their U.S.A. team
when they crossed the finish line in the 2009 Patent Cup sailing regatta held
May 27-30 at the Yacht Club de Ilhabela, Brazil, located on the island of
Ilhabela on the northeast coast of the Brazilian state of Sao Paolo. The crew
also consisted of Marcus J. Thymian, a partner at McDonnell Boehnen Hulbert &
Berghoff LLP, and Derek Minihane, in-house counsel at Intermolecular, San
Jose, California. — Full story: http://tinyurl.com/mlc9uu

* Hilary Lister, a quadriplegic yachtswoman who is aiming to become the first
female quadriplegic to sail solo around Britain, was led into shore by the
Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) after she got caught battling
against the tide which had turned against her amid Force 5 winds. Her
spokesman insisted she was not rescued by the RNLI, but was “escorted and
transferred” to the inshore lifeboat as previously planned. She plans to
complete her journey around the coast of Britain and the east coast of Ireland
in a series of 40 day sails. — Full story: http://tinyurl.com/mc228e

* The final leg of the Portimao Global Ocean Race started Thursday, June 4th
in Charleston, South Carolina, taking the four boat 40-foot fleet on the 3,500
mile North Atlantic route to Portimao, Portugal. Here are photos from the
start: http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/photos/09/0605a/

CALENDAR OF MAJOR EVENTS (Sponsored by West Marine)
Events listed at http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/calendar

STUDENTS BUILD SAILS, RACE BOATS IN LAKE WINNEBAGO
(Oshkosh, WI) – Omar Wyman rekindled his love of sailing thanks to a torn
tarp, some duct tape and a little innovation.The Alternative Learning Program
Charter School eighth grader and teammates Brady Chester and Alex Hansen
designed, built and, on Thursday, sailed to a first place finish in the
school’s first-ever Innovative Regatta at the Menominee Park Swimming Beach.

“I used to sail when I was younger, but I rediscovered the fun of sailing,”
Wyman said. “Our sail worked fine, even though it broke at the end. We still
won, so I’m happy about that.” Over the course of the semester, ALPS’ 60
students in third through eighth grades formed two- and three-person teams to
create a sail of their own design, and used limited budgets to buy materials
like PVC pipe, wood, tarps, plastic, rope and canvas to build working models
of their designs and then put them to the test in the cool waters of Lake
Winnebago. — Read on:
http://www.thenorthwestern.com/article/20090605/OSH010504/906050394

CURMUDGEON’S CONUNDRUM
“Why do you sit there looking like an envelope without an address on it?” –
Mark Twain

Special thanks to Kaenon Polarized, JK3 Nautical Enterprises, and
LaserPerformance.

Preferred supplier list: http://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/ssc/suppliers

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Comments
  1. Mark38 says:

    But what actually occurs is that costs fall on children and are not morally outweighed by gains to anyone else. ,

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