AC45

AC45

The new catamaran sailboat that will be used for the 2011-2012 America’s Cup World Series in now sailing!  The debut of the America’s Cup wing-sailed AC45 catamaran.

The forerunner to the next generation of America’s Cup boats, the AC45 made its maiden voyage in Auckland. “Thanks to the efficiency of the New Zealand boat building industry and a huge effort by our team, the first AC45 is now ready for sea trials just a mere four months after this exciting new multihull class was first conceptualized,” said Tim Smyth, co-construction manager for Core Builders Composites of Warkworth, New Zealand.

The AC45 will be the centerpiece of the 2011-2012 America’s Cup World Series, which will start mid-2011. The high-tech carbon fibre catamaran is the first in a fleet of the new 45-foot one-designs that will be tested by America’s Cup teams before racing on the America’s Cup World Series circuit.

The AC45 is an essential element of the vision for the 34th America’s Cup, which will feature 72-foot catamarans raced on San Francisco Bay in 2013. Focused on creating more on-the-water excitement for both the teams and the fans, the AC45 is designed for both speed and close racing. While capable of closing speeds of up to 30 knots, the AC45 was designed to remain nimble enough to handle the tight race courses planned by America’s Cup Race Management (ACRM).

“The biggest challenge with multihulls is learning how much to anticipate. With the AC45 being a big, powerful multihull capable of tripling the wind speed, your reactions and skills are accelerated. It’s all about being ahead of the cycle,” said ORACLE RACING skipper James Spithill. “I think the AC45 will enable all teams to advance to hard-core race mentality very quickly.”

The AC45 was designed by the ORACLE RACING design and engineering team, which developed the catamaran on behalf of the America’s Cup community. At task was designing a boat that would not only meet the racing criteria, but could also fit inside a 40-foot container, which is the shipping vessel for the America’s Cup World Series.

“The boat was designed for all-around performance so it can be sailed in wide range of conditions, and that means the next America’s Cup will see races start on time,” said Ian Burns, ORACLE RACING design coordinator. “Plus it’s a regatta boat, meant for lots of racing, so quick assembly and disassembly was a must to accommodate an active competition schedule.”

The AC45 had to be robust enough to sail through a wide wind range, from 5 to 30 knots, as well as survive in the event of collisions, which are foreseen as teams learn to adapt to multihull closing speeds.

Utilizing the same technology used in the aerospace industry, the hulls are built in carbon epoxy with honeycomb cores, making them extremely stiff and light structures. The sandwich construction involves two carbon skins less than 1mm thick laminated over an ultra-light honeycomb core.

“The new America’s Cup is for those who are hungry for a challenge and the AC45 is really a fresh take on the multihull,” said Vincenzo Onorato, President, Mascalzone Latino.

“We plan to run tight race courses that will force boats to engage with each other, creating really close racing situations. Multihulls are very fast boats and will therefore reach the course boundaries sooner, so races will become a true test of skill and strategy, not just speed,” said Iain Murray, CEO, America’s Cup Race Management and Regatta Director. “The AC45 will fast-track teams to state-of-the-art wingsail technology and crew technique in the first season, and will greatly prepare them for the AC72.”

AC45 Sailboat

LOA: 44.13’ (13.45m)
BEAM:22.6’ (6.9m)
DSPL:1,400 kg
Mast Height:70.5’ (21.5m)
Sail Area:1430 sq’ (133 sqm) (up w/main & gennaker), 2,259 sq’ 210 (sqm) (dwn w/main & reacher)

 

 

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Sailing in the Lake District

Posted: January 4, 2011 in Uncategorized

Sailing a sailboat at Coniston Lake, in the Lake District.  Coniston Lake in Cumbria, England is the third largest lake in the Lake District. It is five miles (8 km) long, half a mile (800 m) wide, has a maximum depth of 184 feet (56 m), and covers an area of 1.89 square miles (4.9 km²). The lake has an elevation of 143 feet (44 m) above sea level.

Coniston Lake drains to the sea via the River Crake.

Zero Carbon Superyacht

Posted: January 4, 2011 in Uncategorized

The Ocean Empire LSV (life support vessel) is a 44m Solar Hybrid Superyacht with 2 Hydroponic farms and fishing facilities to harvest the sea. Her solar powered propulsion systems and all the Hotel amenities of a luxury global voyager are supplied by harnessing 3 major sources of sustainable of energy.

The first and foremost source of energy is from the Sun which powers Solar Cells (covering the entire surface of the vessel) while at the same time illuminating 2 Hydroponic farms.

The second source is energy from the Wind which powers an auxiliary automated SkySail that drives the Ocean Empire to 18+knots while charging her GM ESS2 batteries through power sailing KER.

The third source is energy from Waves captured through Motion Damping Regeneration (MDR).  A new form of ATMD (Adjustable Tuned Mass Damper) developed in collaboration with Maurer Sohnes Gmbh

The MDR system is basically an ATMD utilized in skyscrapers such as Taipei 101 to reduce their swaying motion. In this application 16 tons of batteries are the Mass while linear generators produce up to 50 kws of electricity as they dampen the motion of the vessel.

Richard Sauter head of design commented “The Ocean Empire life support Superyacht liberates the Superyacht community from its strict dependence on unsustainable resources by harnessing the renewable collective power ever present in the Earths Biosphere”.

The Ocean Empire LSV is a state of the art Superyacht catamaran. As such her Green Tech innovations are able to optimize what is easily the most dynamic form of ocean going platform. Her Daimler Turbo Compound BueTec engine is the most advanced EPA Diesel ever built.  Her Sunpower Solar Cells are the most efficient to date as are her Voith Surface Drives.

Employing existing OEM products and costing little more than her conventional Superyacht counterparts. Ocean Empire’s Solar Hybrid design offers every available Superyacht luxury within her full range of operation which extends from a 50% reduction in fuel consumption and CO2 emissions to Ultra Green Carbon Neutral and Zero Carbon cruising.

As a Charter, a Plugged in Ocean Empire LSV is capable of feeding 360+Mwh’s of electricity to the grid. Enough energy to make up to 12,000 nautical miles of Chartered Carbon Neutral voyages every year.

Barcelona World Race

Posted: January 4, 2011 in Uncategorized

In the first edition of the Barcelona World RACE back in November 2007 it was Jean-Pierre Dick who was first to Gibraltar, escaping from the Mediterranean on Paprec-Virbac 2 with co-skipper Damian Foxall after setting the inaugural record of 3 days 14 hours and 25 minutes.

After making a gain of 11 miles over second placed Foncia since the early this morning, Dick may be back on course to pass Gibraltar holding the race lead.

Racing the new Virbac-Paprec 3 with Loïck Peyron, the defending course champion was just over 30 miles from the point of Tarifa which marks the transition from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic, with a margin of 14.1 miles over double Vendée Globe  winning Desjoyeaux (FRA) with François Gabart  (FRA) on Foncia.

The first of the race’s six ocean stage trophies is the material reward for escaping from the unpredictable, capricious breezes of the Mediterranean, putting behind them the 540 miles leg from Barcelona, but most of the skippers will be simply looking forward to the change of pace and stronger winds.

If they are to break the 2007 course record from the start to Gibraltar the leader needs to pass by 03h 25m (UTC) Tuesday morning.

But between them and being able to close the Mediterranean door behind them, the Straits of Gibraltar promise strong contrary currents – 2-4 knots at times – and very feeble breezes. So the Virbac-Paprec 3 duo will still have their work cut out to hold their lead, likely to run out first of what westerly headwinds they have had.

It has been the southern group of boats which has continued to make the running since last night.

The top six boats, Virbac Paprec 3, Foncia, Neutrogena, Estrella Damm Sailing Team, Mirabaud, and GAES Centros Auditivos, all profited from routing closer to the Moroccan coast, gaining more than 70 miles since last night against some of the duos which elected to try the passage closer to the Spanish coast, such as Kito de Pavant and Sebastien Audigane on Groupe Bel, and Spain’s Olympic 49er aces Iker Martinez and Xabi Fernandez who dropped from sixth to ninth today on Mapfre.

Picking the best route through the lighter and very unstable, shifty winds round midday and this afternoon has still certainly been taxing for the leading group.

The difference of taking one or two favourable local changes in wind direction or hooking into a strand of additional breeze has made big differences.

Both Foncia and Estrella Damm looked to have had spells in lighter, aimless breezes making little net progress early this afternoon, while their closest rivals – respectively Virbac-Paprec 3 and Neutrogena only a few miles to windward in each case – managed to lift away and gain miles.

For the American-German duo Ryan Breymaier (USA) and Boris Herrmann (GER) on their first IMOCA race together, their fortunes continue to flourish as they elevated themselves to third, the IMOCA Open 60 rookies who met only in April for the first time, racing in their six years old boat.

Speaking on today’s live video conference, Herrmann – who won the Global Ocean Race round the world two years ago– sounded relaxed but totally objective about their position this early in the race.

After having had a spell of fast reaching last night in winds of 15-20 knots Andy Meiklejohn (NZL) had a cheerful note in his voice after he and Wouter Verbraak (NED) appreciated the respite from the slow, plodding progress in the lighter winds. Hugo Boss in 12th was making ground on their nearest rivals We Are Water and Renault ZE Sailing Team in the early afternoon, the 10th and 11th placed boats making less than one knot.

Barcelona World Race Quotes

Kito de Pavant(FRA, Groupe Bel): We cant seem to have reliable weather files. This morning we had very, very little wind and all downwind. We have been required to keep on gybing downwind with horrible choppy waves. Now the wind has just turned more to the east and we must go our best with that. The course is still very long. The finish is not in Gibraltar. It is in three months. It is disappointing for us because we were well in the mix. I’d rather be in front than behind. With a deficit at Gibraltar it night not be the same race for us as the first, we could end up in different weather systems. And that would not be good.

Andy Meiklejohn(NZL, Hugo Boss) “We had 15-16 knots last night with some big sails up and that was great, the first time we really had the boat moving at some good speeds. “

“We are pretty realistic about where the boat is going to perform and where it wasn’t. We have not got ourselves down at all because we did know where it would struggle. It looks worse than it is for sure because there are gates with the weather.”

Pepe Ribes(ESP, Estrella Damm) at midday on Estrella Damm: “Right now we are two miles off Foncia who are to windward and we have Jean-Pierre three miles to leeward. To have visual contact with other boats always motivates you but the trick generally is to maintain a high percentage, high averages. The conditions are difficult to read so when you think you should be doing well you don’t. Right now I think it will be complicated for the passage through the Straits. Apparently there will be little wind and strong currents against us.”

At 12:00 GMT on December 31st, record breaking British yachtswoman Dee Caffari and her Spanish co-skipper, Anna Corbella, crossed the start line of the 25,000 mile Barcelona World Race onboard the IMOCA 60 yacht GAES Centros Auditivos. This is Caffari’s first round the world race since the epic Vendée Globe which saw Caffari finish sixth out of 30 starters to become the first woman to sail solo, non-stop, both ways around the world.

As the only all-female crew in the competition, both Caffari and Corbella are keen to put in a consistent and competitive performance and showed their enthusiasm as they rounded the North buoy in third position 26 minutes after crossing the start line. Before leaving the dock, Caffari spoke about the first stage of the race:

“The Mediterranean is complicated and we’ve practised here a lot but we’ve got 500 miles of it to start and finish with and honestly this is the part I dread the most. In stark contrast, Anna knows the Med well but has never sailed in the Southern Ocean so hopefully we can support each other and draw on our strengths in each area.”

After Alex Thomson’s forced retirement from the race due to an emergency appendectomy on Wednesday, Dee Caffari will be the only one flying the flag for Great Britain in the race.

Good luck ladies!

 

Read more at:  Barcelona World Race

Competition for oldest trophy in international sport once again returns to American waters. San Francisco has been selected as the host venue for the 34th America’s Cup. An official celebration event will be hosted in San Francisco on January 5th, event location details to be announced.

“We sought a venue that fulfills our promise – to showcase the best sailors in the world competing on the fastest boats,” said Richard Worth, Chairman, America’s Cup Event Authority.  “And hosting the America’s Cup in San Francisco will realize that promise.”

“We thank Mayor Newsom, Board President Chiu, Supervisor Mirkarimi and all of the Board of Supervisors, the staff at City Hall and the Port Authority, Mark Buell and San Francisco America’s Cup Organizing Committee, and all who have worked so diligently on securing the bid,” Worth continued. “We look forward to working closely with City of San Francisco over the coming months to create a world-class America’s Cup event, and a large and lasting beneficial impact on the City.”

The world-famous San Francisco Bay will be home to the 2013 America’s Cup Finals and the Challenger Selection Series for the Louis Vuitton Cup, as well as an America’s Cup World Series event in 2012. This will be the first time the America’s Cup has been hosted in the United States since 1995.

“Today is one of great celebration, with San Francisco winning the right to host the America’s Cup, and all of the economic benefit, jobs and excitement that comes with it,” said Mayor Gavin Newsom. “San Francisco is the best place on Earth to host an event of this stature, and we could not be more proud to be the city that brings the America’s Cup back home to the United States.”

Independent studies show that the America’s Cup delivers the third largest economic impact in sport to host countries, behind the Olympic Games and soccer’s World Cup. The 34th America’s Cup is projected to pump an estimated $1.4 billion dollars into the San Francisco region.

“As a native San Franciscan, I grew up sailing in front of the City. Racing for the America’s Cup in San Francisco is something I have dreamt of my whole life,” said Paul Cayard, CEO of Sweden’s Artemis Racing, a challenger for the 34th America’s Cup. “By hosting sailing’s most important event in the Bay, the world will see sailing as it never has before.  As a team, Artemis Racing is particularly looking forward to competing in San Francisco.”

Racing will be held on the iconic San Francisco Cityfront and be visible from world-renown tourist destinations such as the Golden Gate Bridge, the Marin Headlands, Crissy Field, the Embarcadero and Fisherman’s Wharf. An influx of millions of tourists is expected for the Challenger Series for the Louis Vuitton Cup and the America’s Cup Finals in late 2013.

“My support for San Francisco hosting the America’s Cup goes beyond the opportunity to see our team competing on home waters,” said Russell Coutts, CEO, ORACLE Racing, the current America’s Cup defending team. “We are excited to sail for our sport’s greatest trophy, on a stretch of water legendary among sailors worldwide.”

The Race Village will be constructed on Piers 19 and 29, with the team bases at and around Pier 30/32.  As part of the plan, the America’s Cup Event Authority will redevelop these piers as well as the surrounding infrastructure to support the racing, while rehabilitating the piers for the enjoyment of generations of San Franciscans to come.

With a goal of creating the most dynamic America’s Cup in history for fans and participants, changes have been introduced to the 34th edition. Enhancements include the introduction of groundbreaking new 72′ wing-sailed catamarans capable of speeds in excess of 40 miles per hour, new race formats and rules, and a transformed media and online broadcasting approach to enable an interactive viewer experience.

In the summer of 2011, America’s Cup teams will commence racing in the new America’s Cup World Series in the new wing-sailed AC45 catamaran. The America’s Cup World Series calendar of events will be published in early 2011.

More about the America’s Cup:  America’s Cup News

Oprah and Russell Crowe Go Sailing

Posted: December 13, 2010 in Uncategorized
Oprah sailing

Sailing with Oprah

A day after Oprah visited Bondi Beach and climbed Sydney Harbour Bridge with her guests, the talk show Queen was at it again, this time sailing around Sydney Harbour with Australian movie star Russell Crowe and his wife, Danielle Spencer.

Oprah Winfrey is a sailing fan, saying she had the ‘time of her life’ cruising Sydney Harbour with actor Russell Crowe.

Oprah has been in Sydney Australia for the past few days, after spending a day in Melbourne greeting thousands of fans in Federation Square.

On Tuesday, Oprah will film two shows in front of 12,000 Australian fans in the Sydney Opera House forecourt. Special guests include Crowe, Hugh Jackman, Nicole Kidman, Bon Jovi and Jay-Z.

Oprah and Russell Crowe Sailing Video

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